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Articles tagged with: recipes

05 January 2016

Herbal Bone Broth Recipe

Written by Flora, Posted in Do It Yourself, Herbal Medicine, Nourishing Foods

2015.1 three stocksSuper nutrient dense herbal bone broth will cure what ails you, especially in these cold dark months of winter. The following recipe gives weight (scale) and volume (measuring cup) proportions. The weight proportions will be more accurate than the volume, but I listed the volume ratios for those of you who do not have a scale. If you are vegetarian, simply omit the bone broth, and enjoy the herbal broth on it’s own. Making these recipes is an all-day affair, so start early in the morning on a day when you plan on staying home for the entire day. This recipe should yield enough broth for a small family to have on-hand all year, depending on how often it is consumed. Purchase high quality organic bones from local farmers, who often reserve frozen bone pieces on the farm, delivering them to market upon request.

21 April 2015

Homemade Golden Granola

Written by Flora, Posted in Do It Yourself, Nourishing Foods

Here's one of the yummy recipes from the Fall Conference. It is super easy to make and is a delicious source of whole grains. Treat yourself.

golden granolaGolden Granola
Makes almost 2 quarts

2 cups rolled oats
1/2 cup slivered or sliced raw almonds
1/2 cup sunflower seeds
1/2 cup sunflower seeds
1/2 cup shredded coconut
1/4 cup sesame seeds
1/2 cup syrup
1/3 cup sunflower oil (can be replaced with safflower or coconut oil)

09 December 2014

Cooking Greens

Written by Corinna Wood, Posted in Corinna's Corner, Do It Yourself, Nourishing Foods, Women's Wellness

cw headbandWhen I cook greens, my technique tends towards the traditional Southern style. I use just about any dark, leafy greens, whether they’re cultivated—spinach, collards or kale—or gathered wild—dandelion, lamb’s quarter, yellow dock, sochan or nettle. When I say "Southern style," I mean chopped greens in a long, slow sauté (30 minutes or more) at low heat with olive oil, coconut oil, butter or ghee along with onions, garlic, a generous splash of vinegar and a dash of salt. When I’m feeling really daring, I’ll even add a little fatback. I cook those greens until the leaves are soft and limp (and yummy).