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Articles tagged with: immunity herbs

11 January 2016

Stimulating Immunity

Written by Flora, Posted in Herbal Medicine

By Jessica Godino

clover blossoms 600x450Most of us rarely think about our immune systems until we get sick. We come down with the latest round of the flu and begin rummaging through our medicine shelf for something, anything, to help us feel better. Luckily there are many herbs that work wonders in acute conditions, and with their help we can soon be back on our feet. Here's a few of my tried and true favorites.

Everyone knows that Echinacea is an immune stimulant. It increases the production of white blood cells and other disease scavenging immune cells. Echinacea can be helpful with all kinds of infections, both viral and bacterial. It is best to begin taking Echinacea at the very first sign of an infection and to continue for at least a week until it is completely cleared up. This herb can also be used preventively; if all of your co-workers are getting sick, for instance, or if you are just feeling extra susceptible.

15 November 2015

Winter Plant Allies: A Root, a Berry and a Lichen

Written by Corinna Wood, Posted in Herbal Medicine, Local Plants

Echinacea, Elderberry and Usnea

Each drop of a tincture contains the life story of the plant - from seed, to bud, to flower. The essence or "medicine" is found in that story. Red Moon Herbs' Immune Blend contains three stories - that of a root, a berry and a lichen. 

ech flower from above 600 x 399Echinacea (Echinacea purpurea) - the root - is a common perennial in eastern and central North America, used by Native Americans for centuries.The flower is a large, showy composite with a spiny central disk or "cone" that looks a lot like a hedgehog and blooms from early to late summer. While humans covet the plant for its immune boosting properties and visual interest in winter gardens, the bees, butterflies and hummingbirds are drawn to it as a plentiful pollinator and perching structure. The roots are the most concentrated part of the plant medicinally and are one of the most popular herbal tinctures today.

09 November 2015

Immune Tonic Tea

Written by Flora, Posted in Do It Yourself, Herbal Medicine

As the cold weather sets in, getting a refresher in immune enhancing and supporting herbs can help us all prepare for winter colds and flus. Here are some resources from Juliet Blankespoor's immunity class from the 2014 Herbal Conference. This is part 3 of 3, see also Part 1: Immunostimulating Herbs and Part 2: Immunomodulating Herbs

Immune Tonic Tea Recipe

Ingredients:mushroom tea
8 cups water

3 dried Shitake mushrooms cut into smaller pieces
1 Tablespoon Licorice root (cut and sifted)
1 Tablespoon Chaga mushroom powder
2 Tablespoons Eleuthero (Siberian Ginseng) root (cut and sifted)
1 Tablespoon Astragalus root (cut and sifted)
1 teaspoon Cinnamon powder
1⁄2 teaspoon Cardamom powder

03 November 2015

Immunomodulating Herbs

Written by Flora, Posted in Herbal Medicine, Local Plants

hand of holy basilAs the cold weather sets in, getting a refresher in immune enhancing and supporting herbs can help us all prepare for winter colds and flus. Here are some resources from Juliet Blankespoor's immunity class from the 2014 Herbal Conference. This is part 2 of 3, see also Part 1: Immunostimulating Herbs and Part 3: Immune Tonic Tea

Tonic Herbs

These herbs have been used traditionally as tonic support for the immune system, and are slower acting with a more prolonged effect, as compared to immunostimulants. Also called deep immune tonics, they are used for longer periods of time when necessary and have a more balancing, rather than stimulating effect on the body. As tonics, they are not typically overtly heating or stimulating and match a wide variety of constitutions. We can examine each herb for its traditional usage and constitutional picture to find the remedy with the greatest affinity for each situation.

28 October 2015

Immunostimulating Herbs

Written by Flora, Posted in Herbal Medicine, Local Plants

spilanthes 400x600As the cold weather sets in, getting a refresher in immune enhancing and supporting herbs can help us all prepare for winter colds and flus. Here are some resources from Juliet Blankespoor's immunity class from the 2014 Herbal Conference. This is part 1 of 3, see also Part 2: Immunomodulating Herbs and Part 3: Immune Tonic Tea

Herbs for acute infections

This group of herbs is typically used to treat short-term, acute infections through the stimulation of immune activity. Immunostimulants help the body to resist infection during the beginning stages of infection, as well as throughout the duration of infectious illness. Many studies have demonstrated shorter periods of infectious illness with the use of herbal immunostimulants, as opposed to placebo. Potential exposure to a contagious pathogen is another indication for immunostimulation. Personally, whenever I fly, I take Spilanthes to help my body effectively cope with the higher concentration and variety of potential pathogens. A good number of these herbs also possess anti-microbial activity, and thus help the body to fight infection by augmenting the immune response, in addition to directly inhibiting the pathogen itself.

22 July 2015

Usnea: Immune-Enhancing Lichen

Written by Flora, Posted in Do It Yourself, Herbal Medicine, Local Plants

UsneaAnyone who has walked through the forests of the southeast has encountered Usnea, but you might not have noticed it. You probably didn’t know that the inconspicuous gray-green fuzzy stuff covering many of the trees is one of the gentlest yet strongest immune tonics in the herb world. Usnea is a lichen; a combination of an algae and a fungus growing together. Also known as Old Man's beard, it grows in little hair-like tufts, with the green algae covering the white string like fungus. The best way to identify Usnea is to pull a string apart and look for this white thread. However, since Usnea is nearly impossible to find in field guides and rarely in herb books, I recommend showing a sample to a knowledgeable person to confirm you've got the right plant.