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05 June 2015

Edible Flowers

Written by Flora, Posted in Herbal Medicine, Local Plants, Nourishing Foods

Most people are now familiar with the high flavonoids content of berries, but did you know that edible flowers are also good sources of dietary flavonoids? It may be challenging to ingest enough flowers to contribute a substantial amount of flavonoids in the diet, but some edible flowers are quite large and tasty. Examples are daylily, rose of Sharon, and roselle hibiscus. Plus, who doesn’t want to engage in fleuravory every day?

calendula 600x400Edible flowers:
• Calendula (Calendula officinalis, Asteraceae)
• Daylily (Hemerocallis fulva, Xanthorrhoeaceae)
• Rose (Rosa spp., Rosaceae)
• Rose of Sharon (Hibiscus syriacus, Malvaceae)
• Roselle hibiscus (Hibiscus sabdariffa, Malvaceae)
• Pineapple Sage (Salvia elegans, Lamiaceae)
• Dandelion (Taraxacum officinale, Asteraceae)
• Chives (Allium schoenoprasum, Amaryllidaceae)
• Bee Balm (Monarda didyma and other species, Lamiaceae)
• Squash (Cucurbita pepo, Cucurbitaceae)
• Pansy (Viola, various species and hybrids, Violaceae)
• Nasturtium (Tropaeolum, several species, Tropaeolaceae)

violet nikkaIf you buy plants, make sure they were grown organically. Many of the flowers listed above are typically grown as chemical-intensive bedding plants. Many heirloom vegetables are also bright in color, and consequently good sources of flavonoids. Purple beans, red carrots, orange beets, crimson cabbage, lavender potatoes, and inky tomatillos are a few examples of the delectable variety of flavonoid-rich vegetables.

Gathered from Juliet Blankespoor's handout from the Fall Conference 2014

Juliet Blankespoor, Director
Chestnut School of Herbal Medicine
56 Sluder Branch Rd., Leicester, NC. 28748
www.chestnutherbs.com

About the Author

Flora

Flora

SEWWnewsletterSidebarAdFlora is the dancing woman who embodies the beautiful and diverse spirit of the entire plant queendom. She speaks for Southeast Wise Women, inspiring women to deepen a connection to themselves, the Earth, and each other.

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