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05 December 2016

Harvesting your dream wisdom

Written by Corinna Wood, Posted in Corinna's Corner, Self Love, Women's Wellness

Winter Maiden Tree smallLike many of you, I have been struggling with staying in my body this last moon. With the help of my dreams, I am beginning to integrate the various layers that have come up for me.

I'm still in process with separating the threads, recognizing that I've been feeling traumatized by the recent events—and re-traumatized around past experiences, especially sexual trauma. I know other women have similar feelings. And I imagine this is compounded for people of color and other groups across the nation and the world.

And here we are at the turn of the wheel. At this time between Halloween and Winter Solstice, we are entering the shortest days and longest nights of the year, a time when our bodies are called to sleep and rest. Even the moon is dark now.

As the veils thin at this time of year, we have increased access to other realms, including dream worlds . . . our intuition . . . our inner guidance.

Dreams are by nature ephemeral; they tend to melt away with morning light. In order to fully engage them and receive their gifts, a bit of discipline is necessary. I have found it well worth the effort. Through remembering our dreams—cultivating them and exercising the muscles of recollection—we are able to link our subconscious and conscious minds. In doing this, we strengthen the connection and dialogue between the two and even have greater access to our intuition during our waking hours.

09 November 2016

Fave stories from the Herbal Conference

Written by Flora, Posted in Herbal Medicine, Sisterhood, Women's Wellness

2016.10 jk 40 600 x 401The 12th annual women's herbal conference in Black Mountain, NC this October, on “Plants as Medicine, Plants as Healers,” received rave reviews, as a joyful weekend of connection, meaning, education, and celebration. According to the survey results, the conference met or exceeded expectations for 98% of you! We've been savoring the sweet stories and love notes that have been pouring in, from teachers, volunteers, vendors, and participants alike.

The following popular classes topped the charts: "Mugwort and Motherwort", "Stones for Power", "Infinite Orgasm", "Cherokee Household Medicine", and "Herbs, Slavery, and the South". And we are hearing that across the board, participants loved the range and quality of the topics covered.

01 November 2016

We voted early!

Written by Flora, Posted in Sisterhood

women voteWe're getting out to vote early this year, and we know many of you are too!

We are proud to belong to a community of women who are active constituents in our local, state, and national governance. By doing so, we honor the suffragettes, who devoted their lives that women may have the right to vote, and to shape our lives--ideas that were radical in those times.

So let's continue to carry on their legacy and work for radical change that honors women and women's wisdom, ensures human rights, and maintains our health freedom and herbal medicine practices!

To find your polling place, build your ballot, and see early voting info, visit the League of Women Voters website.

Thank you for voting!

25 October 2016

Honoring the "root season"

Written by Corinna Wood, Posted in Corinna's Corner, Local Plants

land 2014 10 gravel road lo res 400 x 600We are six weeks from fall equinox. Over the next six weeks we’ll be moving toward the dark, deep winter solstice. This weekend, we are also at the dark of the moon. Here at Earthaven Ecovillage we will be celebrating Halloween, also known as “Samhain,” and the Day of the Dead. What a potent time of year!

Throughout the world, cultures honor the annual waning of the sun as a powerful marker that the veil between the worlds is thinning… and we have the opportunity to connect with the unseen, our ancestors, and our beloved dead. It is a time we can remember those on whose shoulders we stand by sharing a photograph, poem, story or meaningful objects in their memory.

04 October 2016

The Herbal Conference is almost here

Written by Flora, Posted in Announcements, Herbal Medicine, Sisterhood, Women's Wellness

We hope to see you there!

class 2008 10 under trees EDIT low resWe're on our way 12th annual Southeast Wise Women Herbal Conference! On the weekend of October 14-16, we are blessed to have over 50 inspiring and knowledgeable teachers coming to share their wisdom, as well as the hundreds of hardworking volunteers, and all you wonderful women that bring this event to life every year! With over a thousand women registered, we're now in the final stages of preparations, from measuring layouts at the camp, to completing the volunteer schedules.

We hope you'll come join the wise woman tribe that gathers annually in the Blue Ridge Mountains, and see for yourself what the buzz is all about. For up-to-date information on registration and availability, see our FAQ page.

 

22 September 2016

Queen of the Meadow

Written by Flora, Posted in Local Plants

2016.8 queen of the meadow lo resIt's late summer and Queen of the Meadow is blooming, often 10 feet high or more!

Her botanical name is Eupatorium purpureum, in the Sunflower family.

Yes, another common name is Joe Pye Weed . . . we prefer "Queen of the Meadow," as she towers over everyone else ♥

14 September 2016

We are standing on the shoulders

Written by Corinna Wood, Posted in Corinna's Corner, Sisterhood

of the women who came before us

2016.6 c stones bio head shoulders smallI have been blessed this year to be involved with several other special women’s events. I actually just returned from the last in the annual International Councils of Thirteen Indigenous Grandmothers (very powerful . . . more on that later!) One of the treasures has been glimpsing my own foremothers, the women of my mother’s generation who laid the groundwork for the rich opportunities we enjoy today. Many of the gatherings and leaders that have shaped women’s music, culture, and spirituality today, began when I was growing up, in the 1970’s and 1980’s.

Eaglesong Evans GardenerThis is true in the herbal community as well. In birthing the Southeast Wise Women’s Herbal Conference, I built on foundations laid by my Wise Woman Tradition mentor, Susun Weed, and by the vision of Gail Ulrich, founder of the New England Women’s Herbal Conference, Eaglesong Gardener (my first herbal teacher, right) in the Northwest, and Karen Aguiar and Terri Jensen in California, among others. Their commitment to women’s issues and natural healing inspired me to explore my personal power and the power of women coming together.

02 August 2016

Savoring the beauty of Lammas

Written by Corinna Wood, Posted in Corinna's Corner, Local Plants, Self Love

2016.6 c stones bio head shoulders lo resAs the shadows lengthen at on these Lammas days—the mid-point between the Summer Solstice and Autumn Equinox—the Earth invites us to savor the beauty, the sweetness, and the richness of our lives.

Where do we find the connection and belonging that our hearts so deeply yearn for? In our society, we are often told that one romantic relationship should meet all our needs—rather than relying on a wide-ranging circle of sources. Lammas season invites us to remember that making a connection with a greater spectrum of resources gives us more access to love! That spectrum includes our friends and loved ones, of course, and also plants, water, wild things . . . the Earth herself.

30 June 2016

Snacking on Summer Sorrel

Written by Corinna Wood, Posted in Corinna's Corner, Herbal Medicine, Local Plants, Nourishing Foods

wood sorrel 2Walking in the woods on a hot afternoon or working in the garden, I often find myself nibbling on wood sorrel for thirst-quenching refreshment. This widespread, wild edible is familiar to many—some call it “sour grass” or refer to the tiny fruits as “sorrel pickles”. Children seem particularly fond of foraging and eating those little “pickles”.

Wood sorrel, or Oxalis spp., is particularly abundant in Appalachia and the lemony flavor of the leaves and fruits make it a wonderful trail-side snack or a tasty addition to your wild salads. Although it resembles clover, the cluster of three, heart-shaped “sweetheart” leaves, five-petal, yellow flowers and tiny, cucumber-like seedpods readily identify wood sorrel.

20 June 2016

St. Johnswort Preparations

Written by Corinna Wood, Posted in Corinna's Corner, Do It Yourself, Herbal Medicine, Local Plants

Make your own bottled sunshine

st johnswort oilThere is no other medicinal herb that bespeaks more of sunshine than St. Johnswort, or St. J’s, as we fondly call it. It loves sunny open places, blooms at the height of summer solstice, soothes the skin after sunburn, and even brings sunshine into our lives through its mood elevating properties. Establish some of this sunny plant in your garden this spring!

The most well known, most widely used species of St. Johnswort is Hypericum perforatum, studied for its uses against depression—especially helpful for the kind of dark moods that come from seasonal affective disorder (SAD). In fact, it is often said that plants grow where they are needed—and St J’s is a prolific “weed” in the Pacific Northwest, where dark and rainy winters contribute to a high number of SAD cases.

02 June 2016

Herbal Oils & Salves

Written by Flora, Posted in Do It Yourself, Herbal Medicine, Women's Wellness

Foundations in Medicine Making - Part 5

calendula salveHerbal constituents can be released into and stored in various solutions such as water, oil, vinegar and alcohol. Some liquids (called menstruums in herbal medicine making) facilitate the release of different compounds and can be more or less effective depending on the plant and it's properties. Below are several different techniques for extracting herbs with oil from Ceara Foley's class at the 2016 Herbal Conference.

Infused Oils

Oils are an effective way to introduce herbs directly on and through the skin. I prefer to use olive oil for medicinal purposes due to its healing properties and long shelf life and almond or apricot oil for massage and skin care.

23 May 2016

Syrups & Elixirs

Written by Flora, Posted in Do It Yourself, Herbal Medicine, Women's Wellness

Foundations in Medicine Making - Part 4

elderberry syrupHerbal constituents can be released into and stored in various solutions such as water, oil, vinegar and alcohol. Some liquids (called menstruums in herbal medicine making) facilitate the release of different compounds and can be more or less effective depending on the plant and it's properties. Below are several different techniques for extracting herbs in syrups from Ceara Foley's class at the 2016 Herbal Conference.

Syrups

Syrups are generally made to help with the flavors of herbs, especially for children. I like syrups just for variety’s sake. There are many methods handed down from our ancestors. I have adapted this first one from Rosemary Gladstar’s teachings to include my own experiences and tastes.

13 May 2016

Glycerine & Vinegar Extracts

Written by Flora, Posted in Do It Yourself, Herbal Medicine, Local Plants

Foundations in Medicine Making - Part 3

dropper bottle pinkHerbal constituents can be released into and stored in various solutions such as water, oil, vinegar and alcohol. Some liquids (called menstruums in herbal medicine making) facilitate the release of different compounds and can be more or less effective depending on the plant and it's properties. Below are several different techniques for extracting herbs with water from Ceara Foley's class at the 2016 Herbal Conference.

Glycerine Extracts:

Glycerites can be beneficial for those with alcohol concerns or for children’s remedies. The disadvantage is in not dissolving resinous or oily materials as well as alcohol. There is also a shorter shelf life.

The ratio of glycerin to water varies greatly from 50% to 100%. The only hard and fast rule I know is you always need more glycerin than water to preserve the herbs well. Make the extract as you would with alcohol, chopping, macerating, and straining the herb with the final results being a thick, sweet tasting product.

04 May 2016

Herbal Tinctures

Written by Flora, Posted in Do It Yourself, Herbal Medicine, Local Plants

Foundations of Medicine Making - Part 2

 

echinacea tincture 438 x 600Herbal constituents can be released into and stored in various solutions such as water, oil, vinegar and alcohol. Some liquids (called menstruums in herbal medicine making) facilitate the release of different compounds and can be more or less effective depending on the plant and it's properties. Below are several different techniques for extracting herbs with alcohol from Ceara Foley's class at the 2016 Herbal Conference.

Tincture Preparations:

Generally, alcohol is a better menstruum than water for the complete extraction of plant constituents. Various ratios of water to alcohol will dissolve most all relevant ingredients of an herb while acting as a preservative. Tinctures can also be made with glycerin or vinegar although not with the best medicinal results for most herbs. I would use the menstruums for nutritional herbs or very mild tonics.

04 May 2016

Infusions

Written by Flora, Posted in Do It Yourself, Herbal Medicine

Foundations of Medicine Making - Part 1

Herbal constituents can be released into and stored in various solutions such as water, oil, vinegar and alcohol. Some liquids (called menstruums in herbal medicine making) facilitate the release of different compounds and can be more or less effective depending on the plant and it's properties. Below are several different techniques for extracting herbs with water from Ceara Foley's class at the 2016 Herbal Conference.

Standard Water Infusions

Nettle tea cupAppropriate for leaves, flowers, green stems and fresh berries where the substances wanted are easily released into the water.

Make tea in a ceramic, glass, or enamel vessel.

Use 1 tsp. dried herb (or 3 tsp. fresh) per 1 cup of water, or 1 oz. herb per pint of water.

Place herb in vessel and pour boiling water over.

Cover. Steep 15 minutes then strain while hot.

It is best to make infusions as needed due to a very short shelf life. Drink 1 cup 3 times daily.

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