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27 November 2015

Embracing the Darkness

Written by Corinna Wood, Posted in Corinna's Corner, Self Love, Women's Wellness

red candleThe time of year stretching from Halloween to Winter Solstice is a dark and often intense time, as the seasons of light turn to seasons of dark. The nights are growing longer, and the dark evenings come early. I so treasure the darkness this time of year and the quiet it brings.

21 November 2015

Grandmother's Wisdom about Poke

Written by Corinna Wood, Posted in Corinna's Corner, Do It Yourself, Herbal Medicine, Local Plants

2015.10 moonmilk sun lower wide 2pokeberriesGrowing up in the Northeast, I loved playing with the purple pokeberries, painting designs on my skin. My parents allowed this, though they made it clear that I shouldn’t eat the berries of this “poisonous, invasive weed.” The huge poke plants were such a bane in their garden that they would actually tie a rope around the roots and use a Jeep to pull them out!

15 November 2015

Winter Plant Allies: A Root, a Berry and a Lichen

Written by Corinna Wood, Posted in Herbal Medicine, Local Plants

Echinacea, Elderberry and Usnea

Each drop of a tincture contains the life story of the plant - from seed, to bud, to flower. The essence or "medicine" is found in that story. Red Moon Herbs' Immune Blend contains three stories - that of a root, a berry and a lichen. 

ech flower from above 600 x 399Echinacea (Echinacea purpurea) - the root - is a common perennial in eastern and central North America, used by Native Americans for centuries.The flower is a large, showy composite with a spiny central disk or "cone" that looks a lot like a hedgehog and blooms from early to late summer. While humans covet the plant for its immune boosting properties and visual interest in winter gardens, the bees, butterflies and hummingbirds are drawn to it as a plentiful pollinator and perching structure. The roots are the most concentrated part of the plant medicinally and are one of the most popular herbal tinctures today.

09 November 2015

Immune Tonic Tea

Written by Flora, Posted in Do It Yourself, Herbal Medicine

As the cold weather sets in, getting a refresher in immune enhancing and supporting herbs can help us all prepare for winter colds and flus. Here are some resources from Juliet Blankespoor's immunity class from the 2014 Herbal Conference. This is part 3 of 3, see also Part 1: Immunostimulating Herbs and Part 2: Immunomodulating Herbs

Immune Tonic Tea Recipe

8 cups water

3 dried Shitake mushrooms cut into smaller pieces
1 Tablespoon Licorice root (cut and sifted)
1 Tablespoon Chaga mushroom powder
2 Tablespoons Eleuthero (Siberian Ginseng) root (cut and sifted)
1 Tablespoon Astragalus root (cut and sifted)
1 teaspoon Cinnamon powder
1⁄2 teaspoon Cardamom powder

03 November 2015

Immunomodulating Herbs

Written by Flora, Posted in Herbal Medicine, Local Plants

As the cold weather sets in, getting a refresher in immune enhancing and supporting herbs can help us all prepare for winter colds and flus. Here are some resources from Juliet Blankespoor's immunity class from the 2014 Herbal Conference. This is part 2 of 3, see also Part 1: Immunostimulating Herbs and Part 3: Immune Tonic Tea

Tonic Herbs

These herbs have been used traditionally as tonic support for the immune system, and are slower acting with a more prolonged effect, as compared to immunostimulants. Also called deep immune tonics, they are used for longer periods of time when necessary and have a more balancing, rather than stimulating effect on the body. As tonics, they are not typically overtly heating or stimulating and match a wide variety of constitutions. We can examine each herb for its traditional usage and constitutional picture to find the remedy with the greatest affinity for each situation.

28 October 2015

Immunostimulating Herbs

Written by Flora, Posted in Herbal Medicine, Local Plants

As the cold weather sets in, getting a refresher in immune enhancing and supporting herbs can help us all prepare for winter colds and flus. Here are some resources from Juliet Blankespoor's immunity class from the 2014 Herbal Conference. This is part 1 of 3, see also Part 2: Immunomodulating Herbs and Part 3: Immune Tonic Tea

Herbs for acute infections

This group of herbs is typically used to treat short-term, acute infections through the stimulation of immune activity. Immunostimulants help the body to resist infection during the beginning stages of infection, as well as throughout the duration of infectious illness. Many studies have demonstrated shorter periods of infectious illness with the use of herbal immunostimulants, as opposed to placebo. Potential exposure to a contagious pathogen is another indication for immunostimulation. Personally, whenever I fly, I take Spilanthes to help my body effectively cope with the higher concentration and variety of potential pathogens. A good number of these herbs also possess anti-microbial activity, and thus help the body to fight infection by augmenting the immune response, in addition to directly inhibiting the pathogen itself.

16 October 2015

Mother Nature showed up at the Herbal Conference!

Written by Corinna Wood

land 2015 10 bridge to island lo res 2For nearly a year, we had planned and prepared. Class lists, teachers, tents, audio, electrical, food, entertainment, registration, lodging, parking; everything under control. After all, we’d done this for ten years. More than a thousand women were once again, on the way to Lake Eden to take part in the 11th annual Southeast Wise Women’s Herbal Conference. We were ready.

And then we had a last-minute registrant: Mother Nature showed up . . . in a big way. She was packing a wallop and bearing some unexpected teachings about resilience, resourcefulness and community. She brought rain in abundance—from showers to downpours. As the conference weekend approached, we followed the weather predictions and storm warnings with a mixture of concern and amazement. While setting up the workshop tents and preparing the campus under sodden skies, the staff wondered, “Will this dampen the spirit of the event?"

13 October 2015

Calendula: Golden Drops of Sunshine

Written by Flora, Posted in Herbal Medicine, Local Plants

By Jessica Godino

Calendula BasketAlthough we haven't had a frost yet, we have had several really cold nights. Many of the plants in the garden are turning yellow and dying back. But my Calendula patch looks happier than ever. In fact, the plants have put out a whole new set of blossoms since I last picked them just a few days ago. These Calendula plants will live well into the fall, surviving until the very deepest of frosts. And although I will miss them when they die, I know in spring babies from some of the flowers I wasn't quick enough to pick will sprout all over the garden, ensuring another years supply.

Calendula is native to Europe but because of its beauty and adaptability gardeners have spread it around the world. The flowers range in color from mild yellow to deep orange, and because of their intensity have been called "golden drops of sunshine."

05 October 2015

2015 Herbal Conference PHOTOS!

Written by Flora, Posted in Sisterhood

Lena Eastes, the Soil Sisters leader, lighting the hearth fire with her bow drill kit.

por 2015 10 lena starting fire

25 September 2015

Honoring the Grandmothers

Written by Flora, Posted in Announcements, Sisterhood, Women's Wellness

Next weekend at the 11th Annual Southeast Wise Women Herbal Conference

por 2014 10 porch rocker cropped lo res 2Welcome, wonderful women! What a joy it is to be coming together again to celebrate our strength, beauty, and diversity and connect with the Earth in such a meaningful way.

This year, as always, we are honoring women of all ages and stages, but we’re particularly turning our grateful gaze to our elders—to the grandmothers—and to the traditions and insights they bring to us. The 2015 classes include themes honoring the traditional earth-based and herbal wisdom of women from Latin America and Africa, to the Appalachians; from the slavery era to the women’s movements.

17 September 2015

Preparing and Eating Acorns

Written by Flora, Posted in Do It Yourself, Local Plants, Nourishing Foods

The first time I tried roasted acorn meal, I was pleasantly surprised by its rich earthy flavor. Being a wild foods forager I had heard and read about processing and eating acorns, but had always been daunted by the seemingly lengthy and difficult task. After being inspired by their taste, I was ready to try processing them on my own. One crisp fall day the abundant and large chestnut oak acorns called out to my palette; I began to stuff them into my backpack, quite pleased with how quickly I could gather a large cache full. Most of us descend from acorn eating cultures. Historically a staple food in Europe, Asia, North Africa, the Mid- East, and North America, acorns made up half of the diet for many of the Native peoples of California.

chestnut oak acornsAcorns have been a “grain from the tree” for so many Native peoples because of their abundance, nutrition, and sustainability. A mature healthy oak forest can produce as much as 6,000 pounds per acre, requires little to no cultivation, and can grow on and stabilize the steep banks so prevalent in our mountainous terrain. Acorns are variable in their nutritional composition – predominately a carbohydrate source with fat percentages reaching 17% and protein percentages around 4%. Surprisingly, they are also a good source of Vitamins A and C.

10 September 2015

Hawthorn: Little Rose for the Heart

Written by Flora, Posted in Herbal Medicine, Local Plants

hawthorn flowersWhen most of us think of love, the flower that comes to mind is Rose. However, the noble Rose has a humble cousin that is such a gentle yet powerful tonic for the heart that perhaps it should be the symbol of love. This little known relative is Hawthorn (Cratageus sp.), a small tree that loves sunny and windy places. It has beautiful pinkish flowers in the spring that turn into dusky red berries by fall. Unfortunately, no one will ever send you a bouquet of Hawthorn because it is covered in thorns even bigger than the ones on roses!

Hawthorn is well known to herbalists as a restorative tonic for the heart, one that is able to revitalize the whole cardiovascular system. It has been used to regulate heart rhythm in cases of arrhythmia and tachycardia, and helps to slowly rebuild the heart in cases of degenerative heart disease. It is also a wonderful tonic for people with high blood pressure and arteriosclerosis. By helping to dilate the arteries it can improve blood flow to all parts of the body. This little shrub is a good friend to people with poor circulation.

02 September 2015

Radical Self-Care

Written by Corinna Wood, Posted in Corinna's Corner, Nourishing Foods, Self Love

2015.4 c basket woods Life is very full these days -- preparing for the Southeast Women's Herbal Conference, harvesting, parenting my son -- just to name a few. Like most women, I wear many hats. To sustain the energy levels that my life requires, without the use of caffeine or other stimulants, I have learned that I need to practice radical self-care.

Radical self-care includes proper nourishment for the body -- good water; local, organic produce; fermented foods (like yogurt and kimchi); and healthy fats (like organic butter and coconut oil). Another important daily practice is herbal infusions -- strong, medicinal teas brewed with herbs such as nettles and oatstraw that help nourish the body with needed minerals and vitamins.

27 August 2015

Make Your Own Beet Kvass

Written by Corinna Wood, Posted in Corinna's Corner, Do It Yourself, Nourishing Foods

Corinna making kvassI’m a great believer in integrating beverages into a complete nutritional and wellness plan. Rarely do I find myself without a mason jar of nettle or oatstraw infusion close at hand. Lately, however, I have a found a new love: beet kvass.

Amazing Fermentation

Beet kvass is a fermented beverage that’s a traditional part of the Eastern European and Russian diet and it’s considered to be a powerful tonic. There’s good reason for that. Fermented foods provide probiotics that boost gastric health and promote a wholesome environment for beneficial gut flora in the digestive system. This can be very useful for balancing out the effects of antibiotics or helping to combat the invasive tendencies of less welcome bacteria like candida.

20 August 2015

Women Connecting with Women

Written by Corinna Wood, Posted in Corinna's Corner, Sisterhood, Women's Wellness

Connecting with Your Sisters

heartsSocietal norms shift very, very slowly. In the last century we've seen tremendous progress in bringing women's issues out of the shadows. With strength, perseverance and non-violent resistance to nearly universal oppression, women are reclaiming our rightful place as co-creators of a new paradigm of equality. And we still have a long way to go in a world where violence against women continues to be both endemic and internalized.

Much of what sustains us through our journey is the profound, primal connection of women throughout the world in our roles as daughters, sisters and mothers--the unwavering nurturers and protectors of Life. It's part of our biology; it is our essence. It is the thread that joins us with every other woman on the planet.

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